OnePlus 5T Review

There have been some leaks over the past few weeks when it comes to OnePlus's latest flagship, but it still hasn't killed any excitement. At the company's event in New York today, OnePlus has officially unveiled its latest phone, the OnePlus 5T. Featuring super modern slimmed-down bezels in an extended 18:9 display (with a new "Sunlight Display" feature), improved low-light camera performance, and a new Face Unlock feature, all starting at $499.
Overall the new OnePlus 5T, as the name would suggest, is quite similar to the OnePlus 5.

Android 6.0 Marshmallow New Features

Android 6.0 Marshmallow New Features
Android Marshmallow was initially announced at Google I/O on May 28, when it was released as the Android M developer preview. Several updates to the preview came out before Marshmallow was officially named on August 17. Google finally unveiled Android 6.0 Marshmallow, alongside the 2015 Nexus devices, on September 29, 2015.

As usual, Google's Nexus family was first to get the goods, and the brand new Nexus 5X and Nexus 6P were the launch devices for Android 6.0. Factory images for most of the existing Nexus range – the Nexus 5, Nexus 6, Nexus 9 and Nexus Player – appeared on October 5. 


Lock screen
The Marshmallow lock screen is almost identical to Lollipop's, complete with expandable notifications and app shortcuts. But where Lollipop had shortcuts in the bottom corners that too you to the camera and dialer, Marshmallow replaces the dialer shortcut with one to Google’s voice search. This small update is the first clue as to just how integral voice commands are to Marshmallow.

Home screen
The same voice command functionality appears on the home screen via Google’s dedicated search bar, complete with the colorful, post-Alphabet Google logo. The home screen itself is essentially the same as it was in Lollipop (the changes to Google’s search bar and app icons have rolled out to all devices via updates).

App drawer
The app drawer in Marshmallow went through a couple of changes during the developer preview process and appears in the final version as a vertical scrolling list as opposed to the paginated horizontal list from Lollipop. You can scroll through the list or use a new scrubber bar on the right to jump to a particular letter of the alphabet.

Notifications and Quick Settings

As with Lollipop, Marshmallow has a two-part notifications/Quick Settings area. A single swipe down from the top of the home screen will pull down the notifications shade, where your expandable notifications live. A second swipe down on this screen, or a two-finger swipe down from the home screen, will take you to the Quick Settings panel.
The notifications area displays app notifications, which can be expanded or tapped to launch the full app. This area also shows persistent system notifications, such as when a Bluetooth device is connected or other system features are enabled. The 'dismiss all' button now faces the other direction compared to Lollipop, but it does the same thing.
The Quick Settings area displays your screen brightness slider as well as toggles for Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, mobile data and so on. As with Lollipop, these features can either be toggled on or off with a tap, or accessed further through a Quick Settings mini-menu or the relevant area of the full settings menu.

Doze

Doze is, after Google Now on Tap, perhaps the biggest thing in Marshmallow. Doze is an intelligent battery management feature that recognizes when your device is not is use, like when it has been lying on a bedside table for a while, and enters hibernation.
SOURCE ANDROIDPIT
You also may like: Android Introduced Oreo 8.0

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Android Introduced Oreo 8.0

Introducing Android 8.0 Oreo™
Smarter, faster, more powerful and sweeter than ever. The world's favorite cookie is your new favorite Android release.
Android 8.0 represents the current pinnacle of that effort, the very tip of the spear, fresh from Google’s workshop. Android 8.0 Oreo is as comprehensive a version of Android as there has ever been, and it is as stable, feature-rich and functional as ever. While on the surface it may lack grand visual changes, what lies beneath is stacked with usability improvements and polish.
Swift moves:
2x faster: Get started on your favorite tasks more quickly with 2x the boot speed when powering up* 
Background limits:
Android Oreo helps minimize background activity in the apps you use least, it's the super power you can't even see.

Apple Introduced iPhone X

iPhone X
Our vision has always been to create an iPhone that is entirely screen. One so immersive the device itself disappears into the experience. And so intelligent it can respond to a tap, your voice, and even a glance. With iPhone X, that vision is now a reality. Say hello to the future.
Pre-order 10.27 Available 11.3
Apple iPhone X Full Specifications | Review
click image to zoom Design and Display It’s all screen. How do you create a deeply intelligent device whose enclosure and display are a single, uninterrupted element? That’s the goal we first set for ourselves with the original iPhone. With iPhone X, we’ve achieved it.
Super Retina Display With iPhone X, the device is the display. An all‑new 5.8‑inch Super Retina screen fills the hand and dazzles the eyes.

iPhone X vs iPhone 8 Plus vs iPhone 8 Review

Apple introduced three brand new iPhones on September 12th. Three! They include the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus, which have faster processors and better cameras than last year’s iPhone 7 — and now you can charge them wirelessly. And then there’s the iPhone X, a $1,000 smartphone that Apple is basically trying to market as a gadget from the future that arrived a little early. It’s the first iPhone ever to have an OLED screen, and even better, that stunning display basically runs edge to edge. iPhone X comes with other radical changes like the removal of the home button in favor of a new feature Apple is calling Face ID, which scans your face to unlock your iPhone instead of the traditional Touch ID method still used on the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus.